Who is responsible for funeral costs when a parent dies?

If one of your parents have died and you want to find out who is responsible for funeral costs, first see if they have a will in place. The person named executor of the estate is usually responsible for arranging a funeral. Many people choose their spouse, civil partner or children over the age of 18 as the executor.

If there is no will, the family should decide who will arrange the funeral.

Frequently asked questions

In the UK, funeral costs tend to vary on location. While there are many different types of funeral package to choose from, the average funeral in the UK is around £3,785*.

This price reflects basic elements only such as collection and care for the deceased pre funeral, coffin costs, a hearse and a simple service. For cremation, this will also include cremation fees and a cremation certificate from a doctor.

Essentially, funerals can become as elaborate and expensive as you want them to be, with extras such as flowers, an ornate funeral car and a memorial headstone hiking the overall cost.

 

 

 

*Royal London National Funeral Cost Index 2019

There is no one age where is it is appropriate for a child to attend a funeral. It all depends on your views as a parent, the emotional maturity of the child and the nature of their relationship to the person who has died.

Children old enough to understand what is happening may be better placed to decide whether they wish to attend.

It is important to consider the comfort of other people at the funeral, so if you have a baby or young child who could be noisy, try to make appropriate childcare arrangements. It may be appropriate to bring a younger child to a funeral if he or she is the son, daughter or sibling of the deceased.

To keep funeral costs as low as possible, do shop around for the best deal. If you want to scale back even further, simplify the elements of the funeral. For example, you could choose a direct cremation, a natural burial, a wicker casket as opposed to wood, provide your own urn or hold the wake at home to keep catering costs to a minimum.

Explaining death to a child is never easy, and should ideally be done by a close caregiver. If someone important in their life has died, try to tell them as soon as possible in simple, clear language that they can easily understand, perhaps in a comfortable setting free from distractions. After you explain death to your child or inform them of the sad news, do allow time for questions, comfort and support. Remember, if you are in mourning, it is okay to express your own emotions too.

The length of time it takes to organise a funeral depends on a number of things. Some deaths need to be investigated by a coroner, which can delay plans by a few more days. If the crematorium is particularly busy, this may also cause delays.

In the UK, funeral costs tend to vary on location. While there are many different types of funeral package to choose from, the average funeral in the UK is around £3,785*.

This price reflects basic elements only such as collection and care for the deceased pre funeral, coffin costs, a hearse and a simple service. For cremation, this will also include cremation fees and a cremation certificate from a doctor.

Essentially, funerals can become as elaborate and expensive as you want them to be, with extras such as flowers, an ornate funeral car and a memorial headstone hiking the overall cost.

 

 

 

*Royal London National Funeral Cost Index 2019

There is no one age where is it is appropriate for a child to attend a funeral. It all depends on your views as a parent, the emotional maturity of the child and the nature of their relationship to the person who has died.

Children old enough to understand what is happening may be better placed to decide whether they wish to attend.

It is important to consider the comfort of other people at the funeral, so if you have a baby or young child who could be noisy, try to make appropriate childcare arrangements. It may be appropriate to bring a younger child to a funeral if he or she is the son, daughter or sibling of the deceased.

To keep funeral costs as low as possible, do shop around for the best deal. If you want to scale back even further, simplify the elements of the funeral. For example, you could choose a direct cremation, a natural burial, a wicker casket as opposed to wood, provide your own urn or hold the wake at home to keep catering costs to a minimum.

Explaining death to a child is never easy, and should ideally be done by a close caregiver. If someone important in their life has died, try to tell them as soon as possible in simple, clear language that they can easily understand, perhaps in a comfortable setting free from distractions. After you explain death to your child or inform them of the sad news, do allow time for questions, comfort and support. Remember, if you are in mourning, it is okay to express your own emotions too.

The length of time it takes to organise a funeral depends on a number of things. Some deaths need to be investigated by a coroner, which can delay plans by a few more days. If the crematorium is particularly busy, this may also cause delays.