Do funeral homes do payment plans?

Most funeral homes will ask for some of the money upfront. Sometimes, they will allow you to negotiate an instalment plan, but this varies depending on the funeral home. If the deceased person had no pre-paid funeral plan or life insurance, the family will need to cover the funeral expenses with cash, credit cards or loans.

Frequently asked questions

Here are some common elements of a traditional funeral service in the UK:

  • Obituary: Close family may choose to publish an obituary in the local newspaper. This usually includes some information about the person who died, as well as details about the funeral and any funeral wishes, for example requesting charitable donations instead of flowers.
  • The visitation: Usually, a visitation takes place just before the funeral. This is an opportunity for family and friends of the deceased to express their sympathy to the family.
  • Funeral procession: Traditionally, the funeral procession leaves from the home of the person who died, but it can also leave from the home of a close relative. The family may decide to meet to at the address and proceed to the funeral together, or instead meet at the place of service. If you are not sure, check with the family or the funeral director.
  • Music: Funeral music helps set the tone of the service. For example, in a religious service, traditional hymns can help convey spirituality. Upbeat music may be chosen if the funeral is more a celebration of life, whereas playing a favourite song of the person who died can help personalise the event.
  • Readings: Funeral readings allow close friends and family to express their love and loss. Most traditional funeral services have two or three readings. It could take the form of a poem, song, a biblical passage or any excerpt that is tasteful and appropriate. 
  • The eulogy: The eulogy in a funeral is a speech that honours the life of the deceased, designed to evoke memories of the person who died and provide comfort to those in attendance. It is usually delivered by a friend or family member but may be given by a clergy member or the person officiating the ceremony. 
  • The reception: The funeral reception allows mourners to come together in a more casual atmosphere after the formal ceremony. It is an opportunity to support each other in grief, share stories and fond memories about the person who died. It is typically held at the family home, or a venue that provides food and drink, such as a pub.

Despite popular belief, there is no law in the UK which states you must be buried in a coffin. This applies whether you are cremated or buried. It is more a matter of common convention and public decency to cover the body. Some crematoriums in the UK will now allow the use of a shroud as opposed to a coffin. There are many different casket and coffin types to choose from if you wish to save money, such as wicker, or even cardboard.

In most cases, funeral directors will wait for payment from a life insurance policy. The insurer must pay the death benefit, which is a payout to the beneficiary when the insured person dies.

With over 50 life insurance, the insurance company will pay out money to the next of kin or beneficiary in the event of the death of the customer. The payout can be left as a gift, or put towards funeral costs. A funeral plan, on the other hand,  give you peace of mind, knowing that your funeral is arranged and paid for in advance, ensuring your final wishes are fulfilled. 

A funeral plan provides a set of funeral services rather than a cash payout, so it should not be necessary to have two funeral plans.

Here are some common elements of a traditional funeral service in the UK:

  • Obituary: Close family may choose to publish an obituary in the local newspaper. This usually includes some information about the person who died, as well as details about the funeral and any funeral wishes, for example requesting charitable donations instead of flowers.
  • The visitation: Usually, a visitation takes place just before the funeral. This is an opportunity for family and friends of the deceased to express their sympathy to the family.
  • Funeral procession: Traditionally, the funeral procession leaves from the home of the person who died, but it can also leave from the home of a close relative. The family may decide to meet to at the address and proceed to the funeral together, or instead meet at the place of service. If you are not sure, check with the family or the funeral director.
  • Music: Funeral music helps set the tone of the service. For example, in a religious service, traditional hymns can help convey spirituality. Upbeat music may be chosen if the funeral is more a celebration of life, whereas playing a favourite song of the person who died can help personalise the event.
  • Readings: Funeral readings allow close friends and family to express their love and loss. Most traditional funeral services have two or three readings. It could take the form of a poem, song, a biblical passage or any excerpt that is tasteful and appropriate. 
  • The eulogy: The eulogy in a funeral is a speech that honours the life of the deceased, designed to evoke memories of the person who died and provide comfort to those in attendance. It is usually delivered by a friend or family member but may be given by a clergy member or the person officiating the ceremony. 
  • The reception: The funeral reception allows mourners to come together in a more casual atmosphere after the formal ceremony. It is an opportunity to support each other in grief, share stories and fond memories about the person who died. It is typically held at the family home, or a venue that provides food and drink, such as a pub.

Despite popular belief, there is no law in the UK which states you must be buried in a coffin. This applies whether you are cremated or buried. It is more a matter of common convention and public decency to cover the body. Some crematoriums in the UK will now allow the use of a shroud as opposed to a coffin. There are many different casket and coffin types to choose from if you wish to save money, such as wicker, or even cardboard.

In most cases, funeral directors will wait for payment from a life insurance policy. The insurer must pay the death benefit, which is a payout to the beneficiary when the insured person dies.

With over 50 life insurance, the insurance company will pay out money to the next of kin or beneficiary in the event of the death of the customer. The payout can be left as a gift, or put towards funeral costs. A funeral plan, on the other hand,  give you peace of mind, knowing that your funeral is arranged and paid for in advance, ensuring your final wishes are fulfilled. 

A funeral plan provides a set of funeral services rather than a cash payout, so it should not be necessary to have two funeral plans.